Sunday, December 28, 2014

Year End List: Top 10 Albums I Discovered/ Rediscovered This Year



So I always see top 10 lists of people's favorite albums of the year, but I thought I'd change that up a bit (in addition to doing a list like that later), and talk about some albums that didn't come out this year, but that I just heard for the first time this year, or rediscovered in my library and that was played a whole lot this year. I'll do it in alphabetical order this time, but I will try to play favorites on the top 10 albums list of the year coming later.

The Allman Brothers Band- Eat A Peach (1972)
I recently got this album on vinyl for the first time, and rediscovered how amazing the Allman Brothers Band was. It was interesting for me to hear the fade outs on 'Mountain Jam' for the first time, having been used to the CD version. If you're down for some jamtastic southern rock, look no further than this record or their other live record At Fillmore East. The instrumental work and how together the band is on some of these jams is astounding and extremely memorable.






Miles Davis- Sketches of Spain (1960)
I really got into Miles Davis this year, but the record I kept going back to was this one, which I also purchased on vinyl a few months ago. It's really interesting how Miles Davis was just able to bend Spanish classical music to his will and mix it so easily into his sound. The orchestration by Gil Evans is amzing as always, and this record has some of Miles' most passionate horn playing on record. I was thinking about putting some of Miles' 10 inch LPs from the Record Store Day Black Friday box set here, but I haven't listened to them nearly as much as this.







Michael Gira- The Body Lovers/ The Body Haters (2005)

Michael Gira can always manage to leave me completely unsettled, even on an instrumental album. Only on the second track of this double album, I knew I'd be listening to this for a long time. It is the darkest ambient there can possibly be. The crying woman laid over some sparse instrumentation was one of the creepiest things I'll ever hear, and yet for some reason I kept coming back. Michael Gira is infinitely fascinating, and the fact that none of his projects sound the same really gives one the opportunity to hear the full scope of the disturbing content he has to offer.







King Crimson- In The Court of the Crimson King (1969)
I rediscovered this album in a big way this year. I was always a fan of '21st Century Schizoid Man', in which the unison passage still amaze me, but I really got into the song 'I Talk To The Wind' this year. Something about its atmosphere, vocal blending and melody was very comforting, and I found it very difficult to get out of my head. The entire record is pure gold, and there are few who will argue with that, but sometimes you can listen to something one thousand times, but then that thousand and first time will show you great new things about a great record.







Manic Street Preachers- The Holy Bible (1994)

"The Holy Bible" in capital letters in black print with "Manic Street Preachers" in capital letters below, smaller, at the top of the image in front of a white background. In the middle of the image is a rectangular triptych painting of an obese woman in her underwear – the first image capturing her from the right side, the next image from front on and the last capturing her from the left side. Below this, at the bottom of the page in front of a white background are the track titles listed from one to thirteen.
Richey Edwards was an amazing lyricist, and this album was his crowning achievement. The Manics never really made it over here in the states, and that is a shame, because their oeuvre is vast and extremely interesting. I was actually first turned on to them this year, and this album is by far my favorite from them, mostly due to the extremely dark subject matter that Edwards touches on here. The band went Britpop after this, most likely due to the disappearance of Edwards before the completion of their next record. I am really interested to know what their next record would have sounded like had Edwards not disappeared. "Nine Inch Nails meets Pantera meets Scremadelica" sounds pretty interesting to me.



Pat Martino- Joyous Lake (1976)

In a book I read earlier in the year, it listed Pat Martino as one of music's most underrated guitarists. It also outlined his brain tumor and his subsequent surgery to remove it, after which he forgot how to play and relearned how to play guitar. This sounded very interesting to me, so I checked out a few of his records and I was floored. I was able to pick up this record and Starbright, and both records are great. I prefer his  jazzfusion stuff to some of his earlier material, which is more rooted in bop. The book is not wrong. Martino was and is (he's still recording and touring) an amazing and unique guitarist, whose work is as complex as it is brilliant.




Maximum the Hormone- Bu-ikikaesu (2007)

I've never really been a metalhead, but I can definitely vibe with this. Maximum the Hormone is a Japanese alternative metal band that mixes a lot of flavors into its sound, including metalcore, rap, funk, and J pop. This changes in sound happen so seamlessly, and you'd think that blending genres this divers would be a daunting task, but they make it seem so easy. I honestly have no idea what they're singing about, but maybe that's part of its charm for me. If you're a fan of metal, Japanese music, or are interested in some really genre bending music, this is definitely worth a listen.





Armand Schaubroeck Steals- A Lot of People Would Like to See Armand Schaubroeck... Dead (1972)



Before moving to Pittsburgh, I took one last look through my father's record collection and found this gem. The pet project of a nearby town's record store owner, this album (a triple album debut), is the weirdest thing I think anyone will ever hear. Imagine if Lou Reed, Iggy Pop,and Frank Zappa were thrown in a blender and the result sang blues rock or did spoken word vignettes about prison. This whole album is one long story arc of the main character's incarceration in maximum security prison, based on Armand Schaubroeck's own stay in Elmira for a long string of robberies in his youth. I honestly hope the material was only lightly based on those experiences, for his own sake (you'll get it if you listen, or even look at his paintings in the gatefold). This began my quest to track down everyone of his records, and he just released a single this Record Store Day for his upcoming album, his first since 1978. Really excited to see how his warped mind follows up his other records.


Sigur Rós- Von (1997)


I have some massive gaps in my musical knowledge and freely admit it. The first experience I had with this Icelandic post rock outfit happened this year, and began oddly enough from some dialogue about their Hopelandic imaginary language in an old episode of Portlandia. Needless to say, I checked them out, as I was intrigued, and loved what I heard. The band had not developed Hopelandic by this point, but I think I like this record the most. It has some creepy atmospheres, along with some beautiful textures and soundscapes, along with some great falsetto singing and melodies. This is another one of those records where I have no idea what is being said, but I really don't need to know. The beauty speaks for itself.



The Smashing Pumpkins- Siamese Dream [Deluxe Edition] (2011)


It took my a while to get my hands on the remaster of the album, but it is one of my favorite albums, so I knew it was only a matter of time (the remaster of Mellon Collie will probably be on this list years from now once I can afford its hefty price tag). There's not much I can say about this album that has not already been said. It is one of the best albums of the '90s, and its guitar sound, lyrical content, and mood have been a massive influence on my life. I really got into the songs 'Quiet' and 'Soma' this year, and the many bonus tracks that come with the reissue are actually worth listening to, unlike the tracks that are attached to a lot of reissues these days. If you have not heard this album in any form yet, that needs to change.

So, those are some albums I got into this year. I'll be posting my top ten favorite albums of the year, as well as a list of my anticipated albums later in the week.

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Thursday, December 18, 2014

Review: D'Angelo- Black Messiah




After almost fifteen years, D'Angelo has returned with a killer new album. D'Angelo is an American artist known for popularizing the neo-soul movement in the mid '90s to early 2000s, with critical successes of albums like Brown Sugar and Voodoo under his belt. He has also become known for his reclusive nature, and there were countless delays, legal troubles and mental breakdowns on the way to this album. The fame D'Angelo experienced after Voodoo was released, as well as the video for 'Untitled (How Does It Feel?)' (you know the one), caused him to retreat for the spotlight for a while, and I kind of wondered whether I'd ever hear anything from him again. I'm glad D'Angelo was able to make a recovery and put out another instant classic.

Listening to the album, it's hard to believe that D'Angelo was ever out of the game, since he sounds just as fresh as when he left. This album somehow more than lives up to the fifteen years of hype, which you'd think would be all but impossible. However, he came back with a set of groove heavy, well constructed, soul gems that reinforce how stagnant current R&B is. The grooves here are ridiculously easy to get lost in, the sounds you hear on the record are extremely varied, unlike most R&B production, and the subject matter is also varied as well (not all R&B has to be about sex, guys. There are other things to write about.) In short, it's a D'Angelo album, which is a seal of quality among soul albums.

D'Angelo learned to play guitar between albums, which I have to say is pretty awesome if all the guitar on this album is him. The instrumentation here is pretty plentiful here (is that a sitar on 'The Charade'?) and there is definitely a groove feel, but definitely some experimental and psychedelic sounds as well. ?uestlove supplies drums on the album, so that's awesome as well.
And I can not praise D'Angelo's vocal performances enough. He sounds amazing here, and his delivery is almost as varied as the rest of the sounds of the album.

All in all, this is definitely the best, most ambitious and experimental soul record I've hear in a while, and put a lot of modern acts to shame. For a soul or D'Angelo fan, this is a must listen. For anyone else, I'd still recommend it, since it shows there's still some creativity even in a genre a stagnant as R&B. Somehow this was worth the wait, but I hope I don't have to wait as long to hear from him again. Now, I'm off to re-edit my year end top ten albums, because this project threw that waaaaaay off.

Out of a total of five stars, I give this:




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Friday, December 12, 2014

Review: kigo- never knowing (single)



Kigo has done it again.For those who did not see my initial post on Kigo, in which I reviewed the last EP, Close (Enough To Kiss), I really dug the band (Dwayne Pearce, this time accompanied by M.L. McDonald on vocals) and their amazing shoe gaze sound. This time around, Pearce has dropped a single from an upcoming 2015 release (super excited btw), and my real favorite part of this release is Pearce as a producer.

With 'Never Knowing', the fuzz on the guitars is pulled back just a little bit, which lets the other voices in the mix shine. I love the drums and vocals here, and the dial down on the guitars may even enhance the palpable dreamlike and hazy textures. I love the consistent guitar chord pattern to this song, which is very calming and meditative, yet has some drive and momentum as well. It's this duplicity that really makes the track stand out; it has that calming effect, and yet it has such a presence that it can't be ignored.

'Not So (Now)' is this single's b-side (do they still call those that if it's a digital single?), and the fuzzed out sound here is more consistent with what we've heard from Kigo in the past. The guitar stabs here are pretty amazing, and contrast really well with the very hypnotic and beautiful vocal melody. Again, I have to hand it to Pearce's mixing here. The sound here just seems so full, without sacrificing the dreamy yet noisy quality that this style of music.

Without a doubt, I am extremely happy that I discovered Kigo, as well as Dwayne Pearce's other project, Afterwalker (kind of a black metal nu gaze sound) You should really check that out as well, because their behemoth of a new album was pretty great. They've had a pretty big impact on my perception of music and my life in general, especially within this blog. Mr. Pearce actually shared my post on his previous EP, which I thought was just so amazing and inconceivable. The fact that I was able to reach him and let him know that his music is appreciated was just so great, and really inspired me to keep writing. Also, his post on World Mental Health Day really struck a chord with me. As a fellow individual that suffers from a lot of self doubt and anxiety, I thought it was great of him to speak up for people who deal with these sorts of issues and found it inspirational. I hope this post reaches him as well, so he can know how much I appreciate his art, and to let him know that he matters.

Out of a total of five stars, I give this:



Congratulations on the release of your new single, Dwayne, and thank you for the music. As an American, I'll probably never meet you, but you've been a force for good for me, and probably countless others, and we appreciate that.

Check in later for my year end lists. I'll most likely be doing a top 10 of my favorite albums of the year, a list of projects I'm looking forward to for 2015, as well as a top 10 albums list of projects that I was turned on to this year, or just happened to rediscover in my own collection, and that I couldn't stop listening to for long stretches of time.

"Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use."





Tuesday, December 9, 2014

Review: The Smashing Pumpkins- Monuments To An Elegy



Way back when the Teargarden by Kaleidoscope project first began, I was amazingly excited. 'A Song for a Son' was and is a pretty amazing song, and it set the bar pretty high for what was to come. And I thought that the other releases from the Pumpkins on the EPs and Oceania were pretty solid. I hardly thought they were up to snuff with the heyday iteration of the band's material, but I thought it was an improvement upon Machina I and a lot of Zeitgeist. I liked how the new stuff built upon the old, and that the songs still had that Pumpkins feel to them.

Monuments to an Elegy on the other hand is a pretty radical departure from the traditional Pumpkins formula. I once saw an interview where Billy Corgan said something along the lines of ,"people kept asking me why we didn't play these 3 minute pop songs. Uh, because we don't?" Somewhere along the line that changed, because a lot of this album, which clocks in at a very slim run time, seems very compact. I have seen reviews praising this album for its short run time, calling it the easiest Pumpkins album to digest. Is that necessarily a good thing? I kind of like my music on the more complex side, with songs that won't show all their secrets within the first listen. I feel like my major gripe with this album is that the scope of it is very narrow, with heavy guitars, some synths and basic drumming (courtesy of Tommy Lee, no I don't really have a strong opinion) dominating the album. There's not a lot of room for these songs to expand in the short time that each one takes up, and the lack of any dynamic shifts, unexpected chord progressions, or even guitar solos makes the songs a little formulaic.

It's this kind of stuff that really makes me wonder where this fits in with the rest of Teargarden by Kaleidoscope, the project that this album supposedly is a part of. The rest of the project may have had some weak moments, but there was a lot more atmosphere, dynamic and overall variety to the sounds. As for the lyrical substance here, there are some weak moments, but I also find there to be some compelling lyrical quips here and there.

This review may make it sound like this album is absolutely terrible, which is not the case in the slightest. I simply hold the Pumpkins to an extremely high standard (I mean, Corgan and his rotating crew have put out some amazing records and Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness is one of my favorite albums of all time), and the kind of mediocre set I heard here was pretty disappointing. There are some great moments on this album, but I feel like this album is a little too "easy" for a Pumpkins record, if that makes any sense. There has been talk that the follow up and final chapter to the project, Day for Night, will be more experimental, and I really hope for that, because if the experiment here was to make a middle of the road album, they definitely succeeded.

Out of a total of five stars, I give this:



What did you think of the album? Check back in for my opinions on the new single by kigo, "never knowing". I'll also be doing some year end lists at the end of the month.

"Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use."

Monday, December 8, 2014

Review: Ghostface Killah- 36 Seasons


Ghostface Killah has been widely hailed as one of hip-hop’s greatest story tellers, weaving intricate stories in a good deal of his songs. His previous effort, Twelve Reasons to Die, was a fully formed concept album, or rap opera (hip-hopera? Maybe). Tony Starks continues this dedication to storytelling in his newest album.

From what I can divulge from the first few listens (Ghostface is known for taking a while to decode), Ghostface Killah aka Tony Starks went away to prison for 9 years (36 seasons) to return to a whole new world. His girlfriend has moved on and neighborhood has been overrun by crime. Ghostface takes the law into his own hands and begins clearing the streets out vigilante style. Ultimately, Starks is betrayed by his partner in justice, and is horribly injured as a result. Through surgery, Ghostface is rehabilitated, but must wear a mask to breathe. He then continues his vigilante justice, adding to the body count all the way. In the end, Tony gets his girl back in this action movie/ love story epic.

I thought it was a great idea for the features on this album to play all separate characters, making it a lot easier to follow the story. One problem I had with the rock opera by the Decemberists is that Colin Meloy sang all the male parts, so it was hard to tell when he was supposed to be a different character. Ghostface and company are in top form, and their raps are spirited, intricate, and infinitely interesting. The live instrumentation provided by the Revelations is fantastic as well; a kind of retro soul/ blaxploitation soundtrack to an unmade b-movie. The production here is a whole lot better than it was on the album by the whole Wu-Tang Clan, A Better Tomorrow.

I found this album to be so much more listenable than the Clan’s latest album, mainly due to its cohesiveness with the narrative, its better music and production, and for its amped up energy and lively delivery of infinitely more interesting lyrics. This album, along with albums like Run the Jewels 2 and Open Mike Eagle’s Dark Comedy, are really examples of what hip-hop can be when people just take their creativity and run with it. I wish modern hip-hop had a few more Ghostface Killahs in its cast of players. The soundscape would be so much more intriguing. 

Out of a total of five stars, I give this:




Check back later for my thoughts on the new album by the Smashing Pumpkins, as well as the new single from kigo.

"Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use."


Wednesday, December 3, 2014

Review: The Wu-Tang Clan- A Better Tomorrow




The Wu-Tang Clan were one of the pioneering groups of East Coast hip hop in the early '90s, mixing their strength by numbers rap attack with gritty production consisting of soul and kung fu movie samples. The raps were straight lyricism; aggressive and confrontational with a story telling ability that has rarely been rivaled. This union also acted as a spring board for the solo careers of the original nine clan members, all who have gone on to have some success in that regard.

A little over 20 years later, you can tell a few things have changed. For one, Ol' Dirty Bastard is no longer with us, though he does have a few sound bytes on the record. I was a little curious as to whether he would make an appearance and whether any more archival material of him existed. Another thing that is obvious is that some of the members are no longer on the same page. Where as in the beginning it seemed every member had something to prove, and showed this through the most aggressive means possible, it seems the fire has died a little bit. The production here is very rarely like the classic Wu-Tang sound, and it seems a little too sappy and nostalgic for rap group that is usually quite hard hitting. 'Miracle' is the most excruciating example of this, with a chorus that had to be a joke.

As for lyrics here, there are moments of greatness here, mostly from Method Man and Ghostface Killah, though there is an air of disinterest in some of this material. I always feel like if you're not particularly interested in a project, there's nobody forcing you to make it. Except for this case of course, in which RZA literally forced Raekwon into the studio to finish the album. I feel like a Wu-Tang reunion was something RZA thought the people wanted, and we did, but you don't do something because your fans want it; you as a group need to want it too, because we can tell when you're truly invested in a project and all working towards the same goals, and when the group is a little splintered. And that's really what I'm hearing here. Still excited about the new Ghostface though. Maybe with eight less personalities to deal with, he can deliver his next classic album.


Out of a total of five stars, I give this:


What do you think of the album? Feel free to let me know. Check in later, as I look at the aforementioned project, 36 Seasons, as well as the new album by the Smashing Pumpkins, Monument to an Elegy.



"Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use."

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Album Spotlight: Filth (1983)


I've been on a pretty big Swans kick for a while, so, in honor of the release of their new Oxygen EP, and my current obsession, I thought I would share my thoughts on their debut album, Filth, which, coincidentally, just got reissued on vinyl, among other formats.

Swans of yesteryear were significantly different in sound, though strangely similar in their overall approach. Repetitive song structures bordering on numbing and simple but infinitely analyzable lyrical material are present in both iterations, but whereas the current band prefers more haunting and subtle textures, Swans at their debut were direct and brutal. Two bass players bludgeon and stab with extremely dissonant and aggressive chords while a guitar produces feedback laden drones, accented by booming drums and large pieces of metal being slammed together, which all act as the bed track for Michael Gira's erratic and monstrous vocal performances. His voice alternates between yelling, growling, barking, and any other aggressive shade you can think of. This is Swans on an aggressive streak that would continue through the early 80s, peaking at the Young God EP.

Swans shows were notorious for their stand offish nature. Michael Gira would have the club promoters turn the heat way up to produce a sweat lodge feel, stomp on the fingers of any one touching the stage, and even go so far as to run into the crowd and assault any one he saw headbanging, which is an act he loathed. You can get some of this feel in the double CD version of this album coupled with Body to Body, Job to Job, which includes an appended live performance from the Kitchen, which I found amazing. Unfortunately, it seems this material, along with their debut EP (which has been attached to other versions of Filth), will not be included on this new reissue, so if you're looking for some more Swans, I'd probably go with one of these other versions unless you're interested in the vinyl.

As an album, it's one of the most brutal you'll ever hear. It's kind of hard to picture what people must have thought of this album when it was originally released in 1983. These were the days before a lot of truly heavy and disturbing music, so this sound must have been overwhelming. This album is pretty remarkable, and listening to this album and then to To Be Kind, it's kind of amazing how far the group has come creatively. Like their namesake, the sound of Swans is beautiful, but it has been made notorious for its aggressive and ill tempered nature.

In continuing my obsession with all things Michael Gira, I just ordered the Body Lovers/ Body Haters project, along with his collaboration with Dan Matz. Really excited to hear what those sound like. Also excited to hear the new releases coming out soon, like the new Wu Tang, the new Ghostface, and of course, the new Smashing Pumpkins. I'll probably be sharing my opinions on those within the next few weeks.


"Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use."

Friday, November 21, 2014

Review- Foo Fighters: Sonic Highways


For those unaware, the goal of the Foo Fighter's latest project was to record each song of their album in a separate studio in a different city, all the while absorbing and reflecting the musical flavor of that city's musical history and current scene. I go into so much detail here, because unless you read the liner notes, read press, or watched the HBO program of the same name, you would definitely not be able to discern this from the music alone.

I have been listening to the Foo Fighters for a while, and for a while, they've been treading a bit of water artistically. Dave Grohl and company hardened their sound with the return of guitarist Pat Smear for Wasting Light, but the songs were very similar to those on their previous efforts (with the exception of 'Dear Rosemary', but that is only due the awesomeness of Bob Mould's vocals). I feel like they continue the same formula here, and you can hardly tell which song is trying to represent each city, as there is little difference sonically. It's like comparing the endless variety of off white paint swatches; different, but still similar in most basic aspects.

That is not to say that these songs are weak. There are some good moments on this album, with these moments mostly showing in the fist pumping arena rock choruses. Also, guest stars lend their talents to each track, with Zac Brown and Gary Clark Jr.'s contributions being some high points. However, some guests are given very little to do. The Preservation Hall Jazz Band plays a couple of horn stabs, and the under utilization of Rick Nielsen was frustrating, to say the least. How could you have the lead guitarist of Cheap Trick on one of your tracks, and not give him some more room to open up?

So, in my opinion, this was kind of a misstep for the Foo Fighters. With all its talk of variation, it's a lot less varied than other projects they've put out, such as Echoes, Silence, Patience & Grace. So, in terms of the concept they had for this record, it's a bit of failure, though I'm sure die hard Foo Fighters fans will enjoy it, and it'll probably sweep the next Grammy awards (not that that's a seal of quality; quite to the contrary). For a better Dave Grohl led album with a video tie-in, I'd recommend last year's Sound City. A much more interesting and successfully applied concept.

Out of a total of five stars, I give this:



What do you think of the album? Do you think I was totally off base? Check in later, as I'll be doing another classic album review while I anticipate an ever growing number of end of year albums.


"Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use."

Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Review- The New Basement Tapes: Lost on the River




I have always been quite interested in archival projects of this nature. For those who are unaware, this album is the culmination of various artists teaming up to bring life to song lyrics written by Bob Dylan circa the Basement Tapes era. Not only was this an extremely productive time for Dylan, it was also the period of time in which his backing band, the Hawks, became the Band, playing many songs from the Basement Tapes sessions on their debut. These sessions have always been surrounded in mystery, and this project may shed some light on Bob Dylan's life as a recluse during that period.

It's hard to talk about this project without Woody Guthrie coming into the conversation. Bob was no doubt influenced by Guthrie, and even visited him many times in the hospital near the end of his life, citing him as a musical hero. It's interesting to note this, since Guthrie's lyrics have also gotten this treatment a few times, with Mermaid Avenue and New Multitudes. Jim James is actually a veteran of the latter project, and lends his talents here as well.

I was judging this album on two criteria: the strength of the Bob Dylan lyrics, and then the music that was written by the group to accompany the lyrics. And I got the same impression from both criteria: it really depends on the song. The songs are relatively hit or miss, with brief flashes of brilliance hidden within some definite filler. One can easily see why some of these lyrics were discarded, while some were confusingly never put to music. The music written for this album was done individually, with the group then coming together and selecting the best from that larger lot of songs. As a result, there is some variety to the songs, as each artist has a different approach (my personal favorites are tunes written by Elvis Costello, due to his compositions sounding a little Dylan-esque, and by Jim James because I'm a drooling My Morning Jacket fan). This variety is a strength of the album, as well as one of it's greatest weaknesses. The variety makes sure that the product is not monotonous, but the variety also allows there to be experiments that takes some wrong turns.

All in all, I thought this was an interesting project, but not likely one I'll revisit too often. With other projects resulting from this song writing period (Music from Big Pink, The Basement Tapes, as well as the new 6 disc bootleg series release from Dylan), this is definitely one of the weaker ones, so if you're interested in this period of Bob Dylan's writing, I'd probably go to those spots first. This is more a project for the musicians themselves, and for the most die hard Dylan fanatics.

Out of a total of five stars, I give this:


What did you think of the album? Are there any projects you think I should look at, or any you are particularly passionate about? I'm off to continue my listen of Sonic Highways.


"Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use."

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Review: Pink Floyd- The Endless River





Pink Floyd have returned in a big way, and I was very eagerly awaiting this album. When I first heard of the release of this project, an extension of the 'Big Spliff' sessions that were conducted in tandem with those for The Division Bell, I nearly had a stroke. Pink Floyd have been a huge musical impact on my life, and I was extremely excited for the idea of more material.

In response to the negative criticism this project has received, I feel like people put way too much pressure on this release. It was kind of obvious that Roger Waters was not going to be involved, and as to there being only one song with vocals, who cares? Honestly, the weakest parts of the Gilmour led Floyd were the lyrics. Also, the fact that there is not that much here new sonically makes complete sense. This album was mostly recorded 20 years ago, and would share a lot of the same sound as the project the majority of it was recorded in tandem with. 

I feel like this album was a great closer for Pink Floyd, as it showcased their classic sound with references to many of their other endeavors, and did more for the legacy of the band than anything released post- Wall. There are plenty of sonic similarities between The Endless River and 'Echoes', 'Shine on you Crazy Diamond', their spacey period, and of course the David Gilmour led iteration. Gilmour obviously is going to receive the most credit for this project, with his signature syrupy, powerful guitar sound, but a lot of this album was designed to showcase the talent of the late Rick Wright. 'Autumn '68' was a great addition; just Wright playing around, but perfect in its own little way. I feel like this album is very nostalgic, and a bittersweet career retrospective for the Floyd. People for some reason were expecting this big, bombastic behemoth, even though it was billed as an ambient project. While this has way too much rhythm and melody to be classified as ambient, I feel like people should appreciate this for what it is, which is some very beautiful, if imperfect, music.

The album is far from perfect (the second Stephen Hawking cameo was a little unnecessary), and will not replace any Floyd album before 1980s in my heart, but in true fan boy fashion, I'll listen to anything they put out with open ears. And they hardly ever disappoint.

Out of a total of five stars, I give this:


What did you think of Pink Floyd's return? In other blog relatedness, I'll be taking a look at the New Basement Tapes and the Foo Fighters' Sonic Highways in the near future, so stay tuned.


"Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use."

Thursday, November 6, 2014

Review: The Flaming Lips- With A Little Help From My Fwends


Covers albums are a tricky business. On one hand, they want to honor the power and greatness of the original songs, but they also work to put the newer artist's flavor and sound onto the music. Most of the time, the result is that neither happens.  Enter the Flaming Lips.

Now, I've been a pretty big fan of the Flaming Lips oeuvre for a while, and I've found a fair share of their covers interesting. Their Dark Side of the Moon cover album was a little weird,but I think it paid homage to the original, and I found the Flaming Side of the Moon, though a joke, to be thoroughly enjoyable. I also really liked their cover of In the Court of the Crimson King (I never thought they'd be able to pull off '21st Century Schizoid Man' as well as they did). But now here we are with their track by track cover of Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, the Beatles' magnum opus, and arguably one of the greatest artistic statements of popular music.

Like many, I am a massive fan of the Beatles, and Rubber Soul is my favorite album of all time, so the Flaming Lips would have to do this right to win any points from me. After listening to the album through and through quite a number of times, I still honestly have no idea what to think about it, so don't expect any ratings here. But maybe that's what they were after. It needs to be experienced for yourself.

The Flaming Lips are hardly the only contributors to this album. They enlist Jim James of My Morning Jacket, Ben Goldwasser of MGMT, Grace Potter, and walking tabloid article Miley Cyrus, among others, to contribute to this massive Beatles tribute(or riff, depending on who you ask). Surprisingly enough, Miley Cyrus isn't too bad on these songs, though they definitely could have cut her little talking asides (her voice irritates me to no end).

All in all, I find the best songs on the album to be the ones that are closer to the structure of the originals. Sometimes the songs are just shells of their former selves that have been stuffed with too much distortion, synth fuzz, and processed vocals (though the auto-tune fail on the 'sang out of tune' line in 'With a Little Help From My Friends' was hilarious). I realize the album couldn't be exactly like the original, but not even using the melodic shapes in spots seemed like a little too much artistic license.

Obviously this won't be replacing Sgt. Pepper's for anyone, but if you're a fan of the Flaming Lips and the Beatles, I'd say it's worth a listen or too. If you're only a fan of the Beatles, I might avoid it. Looking forward to something original from the Flaming Lips now after their post- The Terror victory lap of side projects, cover albums and drummer firings.

Currently listening to the new Pink Floyd album The Endless River, as well as the New Basement Tapes project. I'll share my opinion on those soon. Feel free to share your opinions on this release, as well as anything you might be listening to.


"Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use."

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Review: El-P and Killer Mike- Run the Jewels 2


From my opinions on mainstream hip hop, one may think that I dislike the genre as a whole. This is most certainly not the case. I dislike repetition and works made with little effort or skill. None of these traits are present on the second effort by the collaboration of rapper Killer Mike and rapper/ producer El-P. This is probably going to be the best hip hop record you'll hear all year.

Above the varied, layered, bombastic, and infinitely interesting production are Killer Mike and El-P, spitting bars with insane energy, mixing dark topics with twisted humor and a ridiculous amount of skill. The record has so much energy and demands to be heard. While it has some of those lyrical rap cliches, the subjects are approached from a completely different angle, and fans of witty hip hop will no doubt rejoice at this album's existence. The lyrics are very direct, but meaningful, and like the production, is far from subtle. El-P and Killer Mike really say whatever they are feeling, and I think that freedom is a strong point.

I hope that this record, along with the previous Run the Jewels effort, become highly influential. I hope that up and coming MCs and producers take this album to heart and realize that you can produce art that is not a watered down reflection of someone else's. I've never really heard anything like Run the Jewels, and that, along with the proficiency with which it is delivered, are probably the reasons I find this project so enjoyable.

Out of total of 5 stars, I give this:





Check back in later when I take a look at the record by the Flaming Lips and company, With A Little Help From My Fwends.


"Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use."

Thursday, October 16, 2014

October Mini Reviews





So I'm back with another installment of my mini reviews with releases from this month. I thought I'd actually try to rate the releases this time, albeit with a little more of an ambiguous scale; the scale being positive, negative or ambivalence (meh). I thought I'd share my opinions on the new Vaselines record, Childish Gambino's mixtape/EP combo, the Bishop Nehru/ MF DOOM collab, the debut EP of Vince Staples, and a colorful re-imagining of Willy Wonka by Primus.


The Vaselines- V is for Vaselines

The Vaselines are a Scottish duo, who in the late 1980s released a few small releases that caught the eyes of a select few, including Kurt Cobain. He went on to champion the group, which had since broken up, and even recorded a few of their originals. This is how I was first exposed to the Vaselines, along with finding a copy of their complete discography up to that point, Enter the Vaselines, in my college radio stations. Their quirky lo fi tunes were very interesting to me (Imagine if She & Him got guitar lessons from Kevin Shields and vocal lessons from Stuart Murdoch). However, since their reunion, I've been a little disenchanted with them. They've taken a little more of direct route here, supposedly inspired by the Ramones, and while their charm is still there in some spots, I liked their more raw and quirky side as opposed to the polish their sound received here. I hope to hear a return to the original sound in future projects, if there are any to be had.

Rating: Ambivalence

Childish Gambino- STN MTN/ Kauai

Following his concept album Because the Internet, Donald Glover aka Childish Gambino delivers a mixtape and an EP simultaneously, the former being his dream of a Gangsta Grillz mixtape, and the latter a PBR&B EP featuring narration by Jayden Smith of all people.The mixtape has some high spots, but the subject matter is a little predictable and some of Gambino's cringe worthy lines sneak their way in (second coming? really?). Then 'Sober' hits, and the EP is just amazing. The production is trippy and hypnotic, and the narration is actually quite interesting, as well as the soliloquy near the outro. Donald Glover's singing has a lot of personality and there are some Weeknd and Frank Ocean vibes coming up at points. Also, that line where they edit out an obvious phallic reference and put in 'love' on 'Pop Thieves' is hilarious. I appreciate how big Childish Gambino is going on his last few projects, and I'm excited to see where he goes next. If he can make a mixtape and EP this layered, I'm very much looking forward to the next LP.

Rating: Ambivalence (mixtape), Positive (EP)

NehruvianDOOM- NehruvianDOOM

I am generally pretty excited every time news of a new DOOM project emerges. I had never heard of Bishop Nehru before, but this project definitely opened up my eyes to this MC, whose word play is pretty spectacular at spots on this LP. The draw backs on this album to me were the relatively dated production (probably consisting of Special Herbs outtakes) and the relative absence of DOOM. I realize he handled the production and he did have a few bars on the album, but putting one of the best spitters of all time in the background for the majority of a project was a mistake in my opinion. And the biggest mistake of this album: the sampling of 'Out of Nowhere'. Never sample Charlie Parker and have it go nowhere, as well is just tack it on to the end of a track. I heard it for the first time in my car and almost wiped out. Please DOOM, don't do that to The Bird.

Rating: Ambivalence

Vince Staples- Hell Can Wait EP

Vince Staples' debut EP is one to remember for sure. I am definitely not a fan of hip hop that glorifies the gangsta lifestyle, and apparently neither does Vince Staples. His portrayal of life in the inner city is a hard an uncompromising one, and points out the hardships and emotional turmoil to be found there as opposed to glorifying it. He continues his winning streak starting with his mixtapes and continuing through his 'Hive' feature and his song stealing appearances on Common's Nobody's Smiling, with his story telling abilities and skill at spitting rhymes. My one complaint lies with the hooks. They were a little weak, and this doesn't fall squarely on Staples, as the featured guest Teyana Taylor also stumbles here. I feel like the hooks just get in the way, and I find myself just waiting for more bars. But all in all, a great project, and I'm looking forward to more from Staples, but hopefully with less hooks.

Rating: Positive

Primus- Primus & the Chocolate Factory with the Fungi Ensemble

This is probably the weirdest thing Primus has ever done, and that's saying something. This album is essentially a song for song remake of the soundtrack to the 1971 Willy Wonka movie, albeit with a ridiculously heightened creepy factor. This is also the first album with the original lineup of Primus since Tales from the Punchbowl almost 20 years ago. If you're a fan of Willy Wonka or Primus, you're either going to really love or really hate it. I feel like this has the potential to be a polarizing listen. I quite enjoy it myself, as I enjoy the really creepy spin that they put on the soundtrack. I feel like there could have been some more instrumental noodling or fills or something, as this is pretty simple as Primus goes. Not to mention that Les Claypool's voice can be a little annoying in spots. But it's good to know that the original lineup is back and recording, so hopefully some new original material might turn up soon. Also, Primus sucks!

Rating: Positive

So those are my opinions on a few releases. What did you think of them? Are there any recent albums you're really excited about? As for me, I'm looking forward to some vintage Ravi Shankar records I just bought until the Flaming Lips Sgt. Peppers cover album comes out.

"Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use."